Back to top

ORNCC Census Celebration

What an exhilarating experience to review the results of the 2017 ORNCC Census we initiated about a year ago. We launched the Census because we wanted to get a sense of how and where NVC is being utilized in Oregon and SW Washington State, and we are thrilled and encouraged to see the breadth and depth of its use. We are deeply grateful to those of you who responded.

We heard from: therapists, counselors, teachers, mediators and health practitioners who utilize NVC in their work; individuals who practice self-empathy and NVC with friends, family and co-workers; people who study alone and in practice groups; people working with incarcerated youth and adults, nursing and midwifery students; mindfulness and 12-step program participants and facilitators; those working with the elderly and those teaching children and their adult child care providers.

NVC is being taught and used in private and public mental health practices, hospitals, universities, colleges, public and private schools, intentional communities, businesses, churches and synagogues, social justice organizations and other workplaces and organizations.

Certified NVC Trainers, long-time practitioners, enthusiasts newly introduced to NVC and others are sharing these skills with so many others, and here in our region alone, thousands more people are learning them each year.

Some of us were fortunate to have learned from Marshall Rosenberg during his many visits to Oregon over the years. I remember that he would wonder if people were not only enthusiastic learners at his workshops but would also continue to find support and to practice and share the skills after he had moved on. The answer is “Yes!” The value of what he created and taught was so powerful that the teaching and practice has become accepted and valued throughout our communities. Here’s a Census response from an empowered practitioner:

“I have read the book and attended a bunch of workshops. I am not formally trained, but I “facilitate” practice groups in my community.”

Looking over the survey results, I think Marshall would be so pleased to see how Nonviolent Communication is not only being practiced but is flourishing and growing exponentially in so many ways – helping to create a world where everyone’s needs are valued and can be met peacefully.

Bryn Hazell, ORNCC Board Member

s h a r e